Searching over 5,500,000 cases.


searching
Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.

Voice Domain Technologies, LLC v. Apple, Inc.

United States District Court, D. Massachusetts

October 8, 2014

VOICE DOMAIN TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, Plaintiff,
v.
APPLE, INC., Defendant.

ORDER

DAVID H. HENNESSY, Magistrate Judge.

By Order of Reference dated July 29, 2014, pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 636(b)(1)(A) (Docket #47), this matter was referred to me for a ruling on the competing Motions for Protective Orders of Plaintiff Voice Domain Technologies, LLC ("Voice Domain") (Docket #44) and Defendant Apple, Inc. ("Apple") (Docket #45). These matters are now ripe for adjudication. For the reasons that follow, the competing Motions are both DENIED. The Parties are hereby ORDERED to submit a Proposed Protective Order consistent with the reasoning and dictates of this Order.

I. BACKGROUND

Voice Domain is a Connecticut limited liability company founded by Bruce Barker in 1999 with a principal place of business in Westborough, Massachusetts. (Docket #1 at ¶ 1). Barker is the inventor of several patents and Voice Domain is the assignee of his inventions. (Id.). Voice Domain is the owner of United States patent number 6, 281, 883 (the "'883 Patent"), which was issued by the United States Patent and Trademark Office ("PTO") on August 28, 2001 to Barker and assigned to Voice Domain. (Id. at ¶ 2). Voice Domain has licensed the '883 Patent to corporations whose products incorporate Barker's inventions. (Id. at ¶ 3).

In January 2013, Barker contacted Apple about the need to license the 883 Patent. (Docket #44 at 4). On November 25, 2013, Voice Domain filed suit against Apple alleging that Apple has infringed at least claim 1 of the 883 Patent through the inclusion of Siri voice command functionality in their devices. (Docket #1 at ¶ 10). Apple filed its answer and a counterclaim for a declaration of non-infringement, invalidity, and unenforceability on March 7, 2014. (Docket #22).

On May 13, 2014, Judge Hillman adopted the parties' joint statement as the scheduling order. (Docket #36). Pursuant to that schedule, Voice Domain was required to serve and file preliminary disclosure of the claims infringed and produce all documents supporting its contentions by June 3, 2014. (Docket #31 at 2). Apple was required to serve and file its Preliminary Invalidity and Non-Infringement Contentions and produce documents relevant to its invalidity defenses by August 11, 2014. (Id. at 2-3). Pursuant to the scheduling order, Apple was also required to produce documents sufficient to show operation of the accused products or methods identified by Voice Domain in its preliminary infringement disclosures by August 11, 2014, if a protective order had been entered. (Id. at 3). On August 11, 2014, Apple filed its preliminary invalidity and non-infringement contentions. (Docket #55). As no protective order had been entered, Apple did not produce documents sufficient to show operation of the accused products or methods identified by Voice Domain in its preliminary infringement disclosures on August 11, 2014.

Voice Domain filed its Motion for a Protective Order on July 3, 2014. (Docket #44). On July 17, 2014, Apple filed its opposition and a Motion for Protective Order. (Docket #45). After extensive briefing, a hearing on the matter was held on September 5, 2014. (Docket #57). Following the hearing, Apple and Voice Domain each filed a supplemental memorandum addressing issues raised at the hearing. (Dockets #61 and 65, respectively).

II. STANDARD

The scope of discovery generally extends to "any nonprivileged matter that is relevant to any party's claim or defense." Fed.R.Civ.P. 26(b)(1). If a party or any person from whom discovery is sought shows good cause, the Court may issue an order to protect that party or person "from annoyance, embarrassment, oppression, or undue burden or expense[.]" Fed.R.Civ.P. 26(c)(1). "Rule 26(c) is highly flexible, having been designed to accommodate all relevant interests as they arise. The good cause' standard in the Rule is a flexible one that requires an individualized balancing of the many interests that may be present in a particular case." Gill v. Gulfstream Park Racing Ass'n, 339 F.3d 391, 402 (1st Cir. 2005) (quoting United States v. Microsoft Corp , 165 F.3d 952, 959-60 (D.C. Cir. 1999)) (alterations omitted). The burden is on the party seeking the more restrictive protective order to show good cause under Rule 26(c). Pharmachemie, B.V. v. Pharmacia, Inc., No. 95-40085-NMG, 1998 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 2192, at *4 (D. Mass. Jan. 30, 1998) (Swartwood, M.J.). To show good cause, the party seeking the protective order must demonstrate a particular need for protection; "[b]road allegations of harm, unsubstantiated by specific examples or articulated reasons, do not satisfy the Rule 26(c) test." Cipollone v. Liggett Group, Inc. , 785 F.2d 1108, 1121 (3d Cir. 1986), quoted in Parmachemie, 1998 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 2192, at *4.

III. ANALYSIS

The parties are in agreement as to the majority of the provisions of the proposed protective orders; however, there are three proposed provision as to which the parties disagree.[1] Voice Domain argues that these disputed provisions are unnecessary as the agreed-to provisions of the protective order and other facts already sufficiently protect Apple and any additional restrictions would allow Apple to use the protective order as a tactic to game the outcome of the case.

A. Confidentiality Provisions

Apple's proposed protective order has three tiers of confidentiality designations: CONFIDENTIAL, CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYS' EYES ONLY ("AEO"), and CONFIDENTIAL - OUTSIDE ATTORNEYS' EYES ONLY - SOURCE CODE ("SOURCE CODE"). (Docket #45-2). Material designated as CONFIDENTIAL can be seen by a party's outside counsel and a limited number of a party's employees. (Id. at ¶ 8). Material designated as AEO and SOURCE CODE may be seen by a party's outside counsel who is not involved in "competitive decision making" for a party, but not in-house counsel. (Id. at ¶¶ 9-10). The parties agree that Barker is expressly prohibited from accessing material designated as SOURCE CODE. (Docket #44-9 at 3; Docket #45 at 4 n.3). However, the parties disagree over whether Barker should be allowed access to material designated AEO.

Apple's proposed AEO provision reads, in relevant part:

(a) A Producing Party may designate Discovery Material as "CONFIDENTIAL - ATTORNEYS' EYES ONLY" only if such material contains or reflects information that is extremely confidential and/or extremely sensitive in nature and the Producing Party reasonably believes in good faith that the disclosure of such Discovery Material is likely to cause economic harm or significant competitive disadvantage to the Producing Party, such as trade secrets, non-public technical information such as product development information, engineering documents and testing documents, non-public sensitive financial data such as pricing information, sales information, sales or marketing forecasts or plans, business plans, sales or marketing strategy, employee information, other non-public information of similar competitive and business sensitivity and information subject to an obligation of confidentiality to a third person or Court.
(b) Unless otherwise ordered by the Court, Discovery Material designated as "CONFIDENTIAL-ATTORNEYS' EYES ...

Buy This Entire Record For $7.95

Download the entire decision to receive the complete text, official citation,
docket number, dissents and concurrences, and footnotes for this case.

Learn more about what you receive with purchase of this case.